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100 Tales of Old Texas

100 Tales of Old Texas

Texas has a long and rich history. Libraries and collections have many old books, originally printed in small quantities many years ago. Murphy Givens has compiled stories related in some of these hard-to-find old histories into a collection of 100 historic recollections. All tales are from books, newspapers or magazines over 60 years old. They were selected for their tales relating to Texas and Texans. You might recognize some of these writings, but most of them will be new for you and you will enjoy finding new adventures in Texas history through this volume, the latest book from Nueces Press.

Thomas Noakes – Diary of War, Drought and Hard Times

Thomas Noakes – Diary of War, Drought and Hard Times

Thomas Noakes would be a forgotten man, possibly known for his painting of the Civil War Battle of Corpus Christi or the 1875 bandit raid on his Nueces town store. But he kept a diary of his mundane life, telling of his struggles to exist in South Texas during the hard years of the Civil War. From 1858 to 1867 Noakes recorded his life as a British immigrant to South Texas as he attempted to establish a cattle-raising operation. His struggles were interrupted by the Civil War. His diary details the hardships of life in South Texas exacerbated by a severe drought and freezing winters. Murphy Givens, as Editor, has extensively annotated the diary to clarify Noakes entries.

Streets of Corpus Christi

Streets of Corpus Christi

Murphy Givens recounts the histories of various streets in Corpus Christi, telling who lived on them, worked on them and what were the businesses and residences that gave life to the streets. This volume provides many photographs from different eras and locations on each street. Givens has chosen photographs that most people have never seen to illustrate each street. Many were taken by Doc Frederick McGregor in the 1930s. However, others come from many sources including Karl Swafford postcards and business and family records. They provide a visual history of Corpus Christi showing bygone scenes.

1919 Storm

1919 Storm

A powerful hurricane devastated Corpus Christi on September 14, 1919. It left an official death toll of 284 with estimates of up to 500 more uncounted dead. Low-lying sections of the city were inundated by up to twelve feet of storm-driven tides. In the downtown, known as the beach section, buildings lining the bay were destroyed or heavily damaged, while the rest of the downtown was flooded with oil-slicked waters. On North Beach, Corpus Christi’s first suburban neighborhood of substantial residences, more than 220 homes were demolished by the storm tide. Those residents unable to reach the safety of high ground were swept into Nueces Bay to battle the storm and debris for their lives. Many died, but some survived the 14-mile struggle across the bay to come ashore at White Point or the Turner Ranch on the back side of Nueces Bay.

Great Tales From the History of South Texas

Great Tales From the History of South Texas

The history of the Old West has deep roots in South Texas where the Wild Horse Desert was a lawless land controlled by no authority. This western region of South Texas, from San Antonio to Corpus Christi, stretching west and south to the Rio Grande, was the birthplace of the big cattle ranches, the cattle barons, rustlers, hide thieves, outlaws, and bad men operating on both sides of the border. Murphy Givens brings the stories of the Old West to life in “Great Tales From the History of South Texas”